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The goal for many of the bills, such as Senate Bill 35, is to tackle the housing shortage by making it faster and cheaper for developers to build projects that meet a city’s zoning requirements — which Brown has long insisted on including.In all, the Legislature approved 15 housing bills on Friday, the final day of the legislative session.Republicans and a handful of Democratic lawmakers who could face tough re-elections were reluctant to support it.

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The proposal, Senate Bill 2, was perhaps the toughest sell and what had been holding up the vote for weeks.

It would create a new fee of up to 5 on certain real estate transactions, such as mortgage refinancing, to fund affordable-housing projects.Both funding bills — SB 2 and SB 3 — passed the Senate with two-thirds votes earlier this year, and won final approval from the Senate on Friday. Brown supports the proposals, which were negotiated with his office. #SB2 #SB35,” the governor tweeted late Thursday night.The legislative package before the Assembly Thursday night also included four bills to coax — or in some cases, force — cities to approve more housing developments, adding teeth to existing laws that city governments have found it easy to skirt.“After decades of neglect in Sacramento,” said Silicon Valley Leadership Group CEO Carl Guardino, “the Legislature has opened the door for more affordable rental and for sale homes throughout our state by advancing a package of revenue and reform housing measures vital to the high-cost Bay Area and beyond.” The California Housing Consortium agreed, issuing a statement saying that the bills “turned the tide on our crushing housing catastrophe by pressing for record-setting investment in affordable homes for struggling Californians to live.” HOUSING BILLS PASSED THURSDAY The Assembly passed six housing-related bills late Thursday night, including two that would raise money for the construction of below-market-rate housing. If the bond measure passes and is approved by voters,

It would create a new fee of up to $225 on certain real estate transactions, such as mortgage refinancing, to fund affordable-housing projects.Both funding bills — SB 2 and SB 3 — passed the Senate with two-thirds votes earlier this year, and won final approval from the Senate on Friday. Brown supports the proposals, which were negotiated with his office. #SB2 #SB35,” the governor tweeted late Thursday night.The legislative package before the Assembly Thursday night also included four bills to coax — or in some cases, force — cities to approve more housing developments, adding teeth to existing laws that city governments have found it easy to skirt.“After decades of neglect in Sacramento,” said Silicon Valley Leadership Group CEO Carl Guardino, “the Legislature has opened the door for more affordable rental and for sale homes throughout our state by advancing a package of revenue and reform housing measures vital to the high-cost Bay Area and beyond.” The California Housing Consortium agreed, issuing a statement saying that the bills “turned the tide on our crushing housing catastrophe by pressing for record-setting investment in affordable homes for struggling Californians to live.” HOUSING BILLS PASSED THURSDAY The Assembly passed six housing-related bills late Thursday night, including two that would raise money for the construction of below-market-rate housing. If the bond measure passes and is approved by voters, $1 billion of the total would go to extend the Cal Vet Home Loan Program, which is scheduled to expire in 2018. Currently, cities are told every eight years how many units they need to build to meet their share of regional demand — but they are not required to build them.All of the bills now return to the Senate for final approval, as they were amended in the Assembly after the Senate passed them the first time. This bill would make it harder to ignore those goals.(Home sales and commercial real-estate sales are exempt from the bill.) Carried by Sen.

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It would create a new fee of up to $225 on certain real estate transactions, such as mortgage refinancing, to fund affordable-housing projects.

Both funding bills — SB 2 and SB 3 — passed the Senate with two-thirds votes earlier this year, and won final approval from the Senate on Friday. Brown supports the proposals, which were negotiated with his office. #SB2 #SB35,” the governor tweeted late Thursday night.

The legislative package before the Assembly Thursday night also included four bills to coax — or in some cases, force — cities to approve more housing developments, adding teeth to existing laws that city governments have found it easy to skirt.

“After decades of neglect in Sacramento,” said Silicon Valley Leadership Group CEO Carl Guardino, “the Legislature has opened the door for more affordable rental and for sale homes throughout our state by advancing a package of revenue and reform housing measures vital to the high-cost Bay Area and beyond.” The California Housing Consortium agreed, issuing a statement saying that the bills “turned the tide on our crushing housing catastrophe by pressing for record-setting investment in affordable homes for struggling Californians to live.” HOUSING BILLS PASSED THURSDAY The Assembly passed six housing-related bills late Thursday night, including two that would raise money for the construction of below-market-rate housing. If the bond measure passes and is approved by voters, $1 billion of the total would go to extend the Cal Vet Home Loan Program, which is scheduled to expire in 2018. Currently, cities are told every eight years how many units they need to build to meet their share of regional demand — but they are not required to build them.

All of the bills now return to the Senate for final approval, as they were amended in the Assembly after the Senate passed them the first time. This bill would make it harder to ignore those goals.

(Home sales and commercial real-estate sales are exempt from the bill.) Carried by Sen.

||

It would create a new fee of up to $225 on certain real estate transactions, such as mortgage refinancing, to fund affordable-housing projects.

Both funding bills — SB 2 and SB 3 — passed the Senate with two-thirds votes earlier this year, and won final approval from the Senate on Friday. Brown supports the proposals, which were negotiated with his office. #SB2 #SB35,” the governor tweeted late Thursday night.

The legislative package before the Assembly Thursday night also included four bills to coax — or in some cases, force — cities to approve more housing developments, adding teeth to existing laws that city governments have found it easy to skirt.

“After decades of neglect in Sacramento,” said Silicon Valley Leadership Group CEO Carl Guardino, “the Legislature has opened the door for more affordable rental and for sale homes throughout our state by advancing a package of revenue and reform housing measures vital to the high-cost Bay Area and beyond.” The California Housing Consortium agreed, issuing a statement saying that the bills “turned the tide on our crushing housing catastrophe by pressing for record-setting investment in affordable homes for struggling Californians to live.” HOUSING BILLS PASSED THURSDAY The Assembly passed six housing-related bills late Thursday night, including two that would raise money for the construction of below-market-rate housing. If the bond measure passes and is approved by voters, $1 billion of the total would go to extend the Cal Vet Home Loan Program, which is scheduled to expire in 2018. Currently, cities are told every eight years how many units they need to build to meet their share of regional demand — but they are not required to build them.

billion of the total would go to extend the Cal Vet Home Loan Program, which is scheduled to expire in 2018. Currently, cities are told every eight years how many units they need to build to meet their share of regional demand — but they are not required to build them.All of the bills now return to the Senate for final approval, as they were amended in the Assembly after the Senate passed them the first time. This bill would make it harder to ignore those goals.(Home sales and commercial real-estate sales are exempt from the bill.) Carried by Sen.

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