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Clyde seems to have a liking for adult-related materials.

In the episode "Make Love, Not Warcraft", he is seen reading a Playboy magazine instead of playing with the boys, and in "Ginger Kids", the topic of his presentation is mentioned as "lesbian cheerleaders." In the episode "Marjorine", Butters, as Marjorine, says that one of "her" hobbies is "Getting my snootch pounded on Friday night", Clyde responds with, "Nice.", although he could also have been happy at how well the idea had turned out, although, judging by his tone, this was not the case.

He often laughs at Cartman's jokes even if the other kids don't find it funny at all.

Clyde appears to be one of the nicer boys, or at least he has a better sense of morality at times.

In "Cartman's Silly Hate Crime 2000", he appeared to be shocked at himself when he said, "I'm not fat, goddammit! In "Lice Capades", he refused to sock bathe Kenny Mc Cormick when Kenny is accused of having head lice, since Clyde believed himself to be the only one who had lice. Garrison to stop the sock bathing and tried to delay the other boys until she arrived.

The film's greatest achievement aside from its textured look and feel is the casting: Beatty and Faye Dunaway do pretty marvelous work in the leads; Gene Hackman and Estelle Parsons also fine as Clyde's brother and sister-in-law (Parsons won the film's second of two Oscars as Best Supporting Actress).

The violence grows increasingly, steadily, as the film inches toward its queasy conclusion, while Penn juggles (successfully at times) ribald character moments with deadly serious--and bloody--scenes (which also became fashionable).

He's sexually impotent but does have a sympathetic heart for the unfortunates and the working class; she's a high-wire act, strictly amoral and greedy.

Their initial meeting outside her house has all the conventions of a standard 1930s drama--and just because the movie's look is generally correct doesn't mean what's happening on the screen is original.

Producer Warren Beatty and screenwriters Robert Benton and David Newman envisioned the French New Wave in regards to the film's approach and style, and their efforts paid off in this respect (it's a very good-looking picture, shot by Burnett Guffey, who won an Oscar).

However, Arthur Penn's direction isn't visionary, and the multiple car-riding shots with back projection don't seem to break new ground.

See more » Although numerous chapters in cinema manuals have been dedicated to Arthur Penn's violent, jagged, cynical "Bonnie and Clyde"--and, indeed, it kick-started a new permissiveness in America movies which then generated many imitations--the first twenty or so minutes of the picture are really awful.

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